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How Forceps Mess Up Your Body

I had no idea that a forceps delivery would have any impact on me. I was certainly upset by the bruises on my baby’s face but I honestly thought that an “assisted” birth was way better than having a Caesarean.

Twenty five years later, I find out that I have major – and permanent – issues from that decision.

To be fair, I don’t think the medical profession understood at the time what a forceps delivery actually does to a woman, they’re only just beginning to understand now.

Twelve years ago, I had a pelvic mesh inserted to help with the prolapses from the forceps birth, the same pelvic mesh involved in the worldwide class action (you can read about the Australian class action here).

The pelvic mesh started causing problems pretty much straight away and I had procedures to try to correct it in 2011 and 2012. The recovery period for the second operation was three months of no bending, no lifting my arms above my head, no picking anything up, and no driving, then twelve months where the most exertion I could do was walking.

I’m just about to have another procedure to try to remove the mesh completely (they weren’t able to do that before) but fortunately, the recovery time shouldn’t be as long. This time, I only have six weeks of not being able to lift, pick things up, bend or drive.

I’m not looking forward to it but I can’t wait for the mesh to be removed.

If you had an assisted birth and are wondering what the possible implications might be, or if you have pelvic mesh, I’d love to hear from you to find out your experiences, so please get in touch 🙂

You can email me me via the link below or comment on the post or podcast or catch up with me via one of the social media links below

xxx

Menopause,Marriage and Motherhood
John with Jamie just after Jamie was born. You can see the marks from the forceps on Jamie's forehead and nose.

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