Podcasts

How To Talk Teen #1

“How do you communicate with teenagers?”
 
“How am I going to survive my kids’ teenage years?”
 
“How am I going to keep a relationship going with my kids once they hit their teens?”
 
For some reason, these questions have been coming at me lately, and having survived four lots of teenage years (five, including my own!), I’ve got a fair bit of experience at this.
 
I’m not for one minute suggesting I’m an expert, mind, I just have opinions 😁 and approximately 25 years’ worth of trying to stay sane while my kids’ sanities were completely AWOL.
 
To give an interesting perspective on this, I thought I’d have a few conversations with my kids on how they survived their teenage years, how the world (and my parenting in particular) looked from their perspective, and what they thought of the whole teenage years experience.
 
In this episode, I talk to Ryan about how I pulled teenagers out of their avid and dramatic introspection (“the whole world is against me, no one understands me!”) and into understanding their place in the world, their impact on others and what’s really going on is just inside their own heads.
 
And funnily enough, yes, other people actually do understand them because anyone older than them has been through the whole teenage thing themselves.
 
Let me know if you enjoy it and what your thoughts are on the topic, and don’t forget to subscribe! 😘💖
 
PS Photo by the amazing & talented Kira O’Connor, who also survived her teenage years in my house! 😘

Find Out More About Ryan And What He's Up To Here...

https://www.facebook.com/someonenewtheatre

https://www.facebook.com/ryanjakeoconnor

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