Episode 201: Why Logic Never Wins An Argument With A Fanatic with Ryan O’Connor

Season 15
Season 15
Episode 201: Why Logic Never Wins An Argument With A Fanatic with Ryan O'Connor
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We’ve all been talked over, ignored, sidestepped or ridiculed when we’ve tried to point out the flaws in the logic of a person who’s wrapped up in and inflamed by conspiracy theories.

WARNING: THIS EPISODE INCLUDES A DISCUSSION ABOUT THE ANTI-VACCINATION AND 'ANTI-COVID' MOVEMENTS.

Aristotle first defined the three kinds of speech that are still used today:

First, there’s logos – this is logic, facts, pure information, the dry, emotionless vocabulary of scientists that provides proof.

Next there’s Ethos, the ethics, morals or values of a situation or person. Ethos seeks to persuade the audience of the credibility of the information or the good character and expertise of the speaker.

Finally, there’s Pathos. This is the stuff of tabloids, the rhetoric of a great speaker, a great advertisement. Pathos appeals to the emotions of the audience, it brings them in and binds them at the deepest level. Kind of like Sauron’s ring or power, yes.

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About Today’s Guest Ryan O'Connor

Award Winning Actor, Director and Playwrite

Co-founder and executive director of Someone New Theatre Company, the winner of the 2019 Grace Marion Wilson Trust Award for Playwriting, and an acclaimed actor and director throughout NSW and Victoria

Ryan J O’Connor is a Geelong-based writer of original, alternative plays and prose.

He also has a thriving business that creates Dungeons and Dragons maps and characters.

He is also an excellent baker, a trained stage-combatist, a terrible gardener, and a moderately talented poker player.

He does his best writing while trying to avoid his responsibilities, but loves to tell ‘alternative’ stories: romantic comedies about Death, coming-of-age stories about old men, and science-fiction tales about mythological creatures, just to name a few.

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